Posted by: Green Knight | February 28, 2013

More Frog Impacts

I ran across a couple of articles the other day covering new studies on the chytrid fungus problem, and how an unusual level of cooperation (for science) is helping to better understand the distribution and severity of cases worldwide. The map of the US shows more problems in mountainous areas than elsewhere.

The article also has a link to a U.S. Geological Survey information page on ranaviruses, which affect amphibians, as well as some turtles and fish. Both articles have some technical scientific jargon, but not enough to make them too difficult for non-science types to get the overall message.

I got these from a Facebook page, either the conservation & biodiversity one or the herpetology one (it’s pretty much all the same members). I also get cool articles from sites like ScienceNews, ScienceDaily, and the Nature magazine site. ScienceNews, especially, is good general info for non-technical types who are still  interested in what’s going on in science. I also subscribe to NASA News, since astronomy was another one of my majors.

Here are the frog articles:

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/27/mapping-a-plague-of-frogs/

http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/other_diseases/ranavirus.jsp

also, here’s one on species diversity helping various amphibians resist trematode worm infections. The cysts cause multiple hind limbs and other deformities.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/348284/description/News_in_Brief_Diversity_breeds_disease_resistance_in_frogs

toads mating

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